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Re: INFOBUS: Moving beyond self injury & other destructive behaviours

I second @stonepixie. I knew there was a difference but I didn't know the terms.
I'm also going to take that that even if its hard to ask for help it's really important to.
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Trying to make my misery
just a piece of my history
A little less victim a little more victory
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Re: INFOBUS: Moving beyond self injury & other destructive behaviours

Also, what classifies as self-injury. So many things that I would not of thought of!

My entire life can be described in one sentence: It didn't go as planned and that's okay. ツ

Re: INFOBUS: Moving beyond self injury & other destructive behaviours

Alrighty, here's a rundown about what we've talked about tonight!

 

Bad habits and self-injury: the differences

It can sometimes be confusing to tell the difference or find the line between a bad habit and self-injury. Some of us have previously never thought about it. Both can be impulsive. Self-injury can turn into a habit and a bad habit can turn into self-injury. However, self-injury is direct and deliberate to the body, without suicidal intent. It’s understood that it can stem from trying to get rid of painful emotions or memories. Little things that we previously didn’t think were harmful still can be (i.e. suggestions of less extreme self-injury techniques in place of potentially lethal ones).

 

Self-destruction

Some of us as well as people we know have behaved in a self-destructive way to cope. It can make us feel like we are in control of our emotions. Self-destructive behaviours can play a large part in our lives in numerous ways. It can be pressuring, lead to self-loathing and is seen as a last resort. With our experiences, finding healthy ways of coping can be difficult.  

 

Spotting warning signs

Feeling alone, difficulty in trusting others, not telling the truth about their well-being, feeling agitated, overwhelmed, upset and apathetic are examples of some warning signs that can lead to self-destructive behaviours. It looks like we have methods of coping to prevent this from happening, whether it’s a personal ritual or waiting for a certain amount of time to think about it.

 

Healthy behaviours in emotional coping
Taking some time out is a useful strategy and a great starting point in finding healthy coping methods. Self-soothing can also help by building more self-compassion. Sometimes, we forget that we definitely deserved to be soothed or find some peace. Exercise is a really awesome outlet when handling some difficult or painful emotions. You can also pass the time by removing yourself from the situation (i.e. moving to a different room) to cope instead of using self-destructive behaviours. Creative pursuits are common strategies with everyone. This could be journaling, drawing, modelling clay or play-dough as well as creating a clip of pictures with a song that comforts you. Doing a practical activity like fixing cars, bikes or something faulty in the kitchen can also act as distractions from self-injury.

 

Asking for help
Finding help can be difficult but it can be very beneficial in the end. Learning to ask for help and working on it is fantastic. A lot of us have learnt that it’s ok to ask for help and that it gets easier with some time. Further education, understanding and awareness about self-destructive behaviours could make it easier for people to ask for help.

 

Helping out
Keeping in touch with someone when they’re experiencing something emotionally painful can be really helpful. Having a broad support network and knowing that there are people and services available too is beneficial. Different people can help someone with different things and they can teach you different things. It’s also important to have a balance between looking after yourself and others as well as having boundaries.

 

When help is not wanted
When someone you love is coping by using self-destructive behaviours, it’s important tonot be forceful. Let them know that you’re there for them when they feel ready in finding help so that you can do it together. 

 

 

For more info, you can take a look at: 

___________________________________________________
Stay excellent

Re: INFOBUS: Moving beyond self injury & other destructive behaviours

Thanks for talking about this topic. Smiley Happy

I also take away the difference between self harm and self injury. I have always flipped between the two words never knowing there was a difference.

Re: INFOBUS: Moving beyond self injury & other destructive behaviours

Ok bye all see you next month for another Infobus & special guest and we're also chatting every Monday night for Getting Real:http://forums.au.reachout.com/t5/The-Getting-Real-sessions/bd-p/Getting_Real_sessions

Online Community Manager

ReachOut.com

Re: INFOBUS: Moving beyond self injury & other destructive behaviours

@stonepixie yes that too!

Thanks for an awesome session everyone! Smiley Happy

Remember you're amazing just as you are Heart

Re: INFOBUS: Moving beyond self injury & other destructive behaviours

Thanks @SarahS I found your knowledge really beneficial, especially as a psych student Smiley Happy

Re: INFOBUS: Moving beyond self injury & other destructive behaviours

Yes! Please do participate in the Get Real sessions. It gets rather lonely some times. But the mods are awesome! Cat Happy

My entire life can be described in one sentence: It didn't go as planned and that's okay. ツ