cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Re: INFOBUS: Reaching Out to a Professional


@MM...funny psychologists don't work for you.  My psych told me once she wished people had the insight and understanding that I have.  I'm not really your typical client and I take a different approach to things.  So she's really working with me on that.

@DD  If my GP said it's too much paperwork I would be questioning them.  I would not find that acceptable at all.

Re: INFOBUS: Reaching Out to a Professional

@Bee

hey its really ok to not say anything, or just um or yes or i dunno, in a session. your professional has had the training to support you to start talking when you're ready, and, to help you figure out the way(s) you feel most comfortable to talk

Re: INFOBUS: Reaching Out to a Professional


Also I love what's been said about knowing things about the person you're speaking to. It made me feel so much better/more comfortable when I actually knew that they could relate to me, even if it wasn't always in a mental health sense.

 

Although, it did make me wonder a bit about when I may start thinking of them as more of a friend than the professional/client relationship.

 

 

What do people expect and want from health professionals? Can you describe your ideal appointment or chat with a professional? (It’s great to be clear about what you want - if you can)

 


Ummm....Firstly I want them to be friendly. I want them to ask what's going on recently and if there's anything I wanted to speak about but I want them to already have an idea of what they're going to do in the session. 

I want them to give me options regarding treatment and carry through completely with it. Then if it doesn't work make changes as soon as we realise it's not working.

I think it worked better for me when there was something practical either about the sessions or for me to do alone. Them walking me through some of the more difficult things would be great - for example, when shopping centres freaked me out going out to a shopping centre once or twice with me.

I want them to talk about their lives a bit as well. Especially if they're having a slightly off day. Making me feel like they're used to people feeling/thinking the way I am. 

 

Ideally, I'd want someone who has had mental health stuff going on themselves. Someone who has seen someone (or a few someones!). I met a couple of them, and clicked really quickly with them, liking them a lot.

Re: INFOBUS: Reaching Out to a Professional

What ideas do people have for breaking the ice with a professional? What can you do to make those first few seconds and the minutes that follow as comfortable as possible?


I'm pretty terrible at this. I generally wait for them to break the ice with me... 

I think trying to be open and honest about the fact that you're nervous is a good way. And perhaps starting with some general, lighter stuff, like background info. Also smiling Smiley Happy

Re: INFOBUS: Reaching Out to a Professional


@mischiefmanaged wrote:
Welcome dedicatedreamer - sorry to hear you are going through a relapse. I think it's really important to be open with our health professionals about the level of support we require at that point in time. For example, I was feeling really bad but I didn't really express it very well to my psychiatrist so he said that I could make an appointment for a month's time, but I said that was too long and he was totally okay with that. So it's important to stand up for what you need! Smiley Happy

Thanks MM. Yeah, I'm realising how important it is to speak up. I was previously doing really well so it's been hard to make them understand (my psychologist was/ is still thinking that I don't need much support) but I think I'm finally starting to get there.

 

What do people expect and want from health professionals? Can you describe your ideal appointment or chat with a professional? (It’s great to be clear about what you want - if you can)


Ideally, the person would let me talk through things without trying to steer me through it too quickly. I am someone who needs a lot of time to talk through and process things, I don't like being rushed through to a solution. I need to understand things before I can accept and deal with them. I don't mind if they interject in a way that helps me to keep processing my thoughts though - like by paraphrasing back to me what I'm saying. Then we would identify the things I want to change/ goals. I don't want them to push me to a big change or goal before I'm ready though. I think that would be an ideal chat.

 

@Rebecca: Thank you. That does help Smiley Happy

Re: INFOBUS: Reaching Out to a Professional


@Sophie-RO wrote:

Ok, so I really wanna know what you all do to make those first few seconds and the minutes that follow as comfortable as possible? What ideas do you have for breaking the ice?


My therapist usually asks me how I'm going generally and I start rattling off something that I did that day and I see how everything's going with her too.  She's in the middle of renovations on her private practice and I have inputed a lot of my expertise into that.  But it took a little while to get to that point.

Re: INFOBUS: Reaching Out to a Professional

totally agree graphiqual - I like them to break the ice. I like it when they ask me TONS of questions at the first appointment. I like to know that they are interested in me as a person, so not just clinical questions but questions about hobbies and what my goals are and stuff like that. It makes me feel more relaxed when they take the time to get to know me. I hate it when they just ask me criteria from the DSM (for those who don't know what the DSM is, it's the criteria that psychiatrists use to diagnose you).
Highlighted

Re: INFOBUS: Reaching Out to a Professional

@Birdeye

what a good list:
- friendly
-give me options
-help carry thru with decisions i make
-be ok to go back and make changes to the plan
-practical things i can do on my own
-be real about where they are at when you're in session (tired, sick, off day etc..)
-someone who has insight into what its like (i.e. scary!!!) to talk to professionals

i changed my mind, its a great list Smiley Happy

Re: INFOBUS: Reaching Out to a Professional

DD: I like the idea of working out together what you want to change - I think that's very important!
It's important for you to remember that relapses happen and your health professionals will understand that - they won't be angry or disappointed or anything, it's just the way it happens with these kinds of things. They are there to help you get through those relapses but you do need to be open and honest with them. Smiley Happy

Re: INFOBUS: Reaching Out to a Professional


@mischiefmanaged wrote:
totally agree graphiqual - I like them to break the ice. I like it when they ask me TONS of questions at the first appointment. I like to know that they are interested in me as a person, so not just clinical questions but questions about hobbies and what my goals are and stuff like that. It makes me feel more relaxed when they take the time to get to know me. I hate it when they just ask me criteria from the DSM (for those who don't know what the DSM is, it's the criteria that psychiatrists use to diagnose you).

This is very true.  Actually I'm going to start seeing a new psychologist in two weeks, to coincide with the one I'm already seeing.  So I'm unsure about it.  It's weird because I've already met her in a different capacity, so I don't know if she will remember me at all.  But I also have no idea what she's going to want to know and where the sessions going to go.  I can imagine it being very strict and professional.  Which is probably good for me to have a really rigid structure with someone again.