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Re: [CHAT] Help! Is anybody out there?

I guess it also depends upon what help they would need as well. Sometimes all they need is a listening ear.

So I would definitely listen with intent to understand instead of intent to reply, which most people seem to do today.

My entire life can be described in one sentence: It didn't go as planned and that's okay. ツ

Re: [CHAT] Help! Is anybody out there?

@stonepixie Agree with having the intent to reply, rather than to understand. I find that people freak out at times and that can lead to trying to find answers as fast as they can. 

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Stay excellent

Re: [CHAT] Help! Is anybody out there?

Alright, guys. Just to wrap up tonight's session on getting help...the summary!

 

Getting help is important and positive!

Getting help is nothing to be ashamed of! Not only does it make you a happier person, it also helps you to be at the top of your game. Getting things off of your chest and working it through is a wonderful feeling. Gaining confidence is a great outcome as you’re able to find the necessary tools and learn new skills to help yourself and others too. Without finding help, it could escalate and accumulate after awhile, which makes you feel really crumby. You might recover slower than you’d expect. It could even turn into something quite minor to something HUGE.

 

Places to go and people to see

There are many services you can visit as well as people you can talk to, in order to find help. They could be family, friends, school/uni counsellors, psychologists, doctors, or a person that you trust who is respectful of your privacy and confidentiality. Services could be Kids Helpline, headspace, youth drop-in clinics, charity shops and online forums like R.O!

 

Help for you and me
Sometimes, we’re unaware that we may need some help. We might need it to be pointed out to us by those who care about us. We could be feeling really stressed, withdrawn or even the complete opposite! It seems that we agree on behavioural changes as one of the key signs to reach out. Knowing your friends and knowing you are very important!

 

Overcoming barriers

Bad experiences, stigma, not wanting to bother other people, remaining polite, not wanting to be a piece of gossip are some things that can get in the way of getting help. There’s also not knowing who to ask for help and not having any physical access to services too. However, there are some ways of overcoming them. They include finding help anonymously, talking to someone you trust or accessing services via phone or online like beyondblue. Self-talk is also an awesome coping skill that can be used as the first step to overcoming barriers.

 

Those steps
Finding pro help, such as a GP and psychologist or counsellor, is a great first step. At school, you could see a teacher or a guidance counsellor. At uni, there’s student support services. But don’t forget your friends! They can talk it out with you. You could write your thoughts in a journal or look online when you feel comfortable about it.

 

Relaxation tips for first-time help-seekers
It can be really scary when you reach out to find help for the first time. Talking about subjects comfortably, being open about the topic and your experiences and being empathetic are some good starting points to help others relax. Doing some positive self-talk as well as some deep breathing can also help you calm down too. Writing out a list on what you would like to talk about can give a bit of structure to talking about it. Setting some ground rules and being understanding of each others’ boundaries should be taken into account too. It seems that we all agree that it’s important to know that you may not find answers all at once.

 

Helping someone out
It looks like we tend to react differently when we’re trying to help someone out. Depending on their age, we may recommend a particular service to them, like headspace. Although, first thing’s first, we recommend visiting a GP for a referral to see a psychologist or counsellor. Sometimes, the person you’re helping out may just want to be listened to, rather than finding an immediate answer. 

___________________________________________________
Stay excellent

Re: [CHAT] Help! Is anybody out there?

Awesome summary, @Myvo !! See you all next week, thanks for a good chat <3

Re: [CHAT] Help! Is anybody out there?

Thanks for tonight @Myvo, @dreamcatcher and @Sophie-RO.

 

  


My entire life can be described in one sentence: It didn't go as planned and that's okay. ツ