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Re: Chronic illnesses affect all of us

heres my fun fact:

 

In 2004-05, people with chronic disease were
more likely to not participate in the labour force, were less likely to be
employed full-time, and more likely to be unemployed, than those without
chronic disease.

Re: Chronic illnesses affect all of us


@Sophie-RO wrote:

 

Are you able to find a "fun fact" on chronic illness and share it too? Cut and paste it below....


While many illnesses can be considered chronic, there are 12 major chronic conditions that are a significant burden in terms of morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs in Australia, including:

  • Coronary heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Lung cancer
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Depression
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Arthritis
  • Osteoporosis
  • Asthma
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Oral disease

From Victorian Govt: here

Re: Chronic illnesses affect all of us

In 2006-07, arthritis, diabetes and depression were chronic conditions commonly managed at GP consultations (each accounted for 2.5% of all consultations). See Australia's health 2008.

Highlighted

Re: Chronic illnesses affect all of us

Heres a summary of tonight everyone Smiley Happy

 

1. What is a chronic illness in your opinion? How is it different from illness?

Chronic Illness

Illness

Long lasting.

Acute – can still be notably be unwell.

Ongoing interference with everyday life.

Shorter duration.

Work, social, financial etc components are more heavily impacted.

 

 

2. Do you know anyone with a chronic illness?

  • family members
  • patients in a hospital
  • close friends

What is something you admire about them?

  • Ability to take their health in their stride. They have a willingness to adjust their lives to manage their health.
  • Not getting angry or frustrated with it.
  • How accepting they are of their conditions.
  • How organised these people are- especially in relation to keeping up with appointments.
  • Their ability to constantly try and engage in healthy activities.
  • How positive they can be.
  • Their resilience.
  • That they allow themselves to have moments of anger and frustration – this is good to seem them process their emotions.
  • Makes these people more self aware – they can appreciate their limits.

3. What types of chronic illnesses do you know of? E.g. diseases, injuries etc.

Physiological diseases: asthma, aids, cancers, chronic fatigue, chronic pain, diabetes, cystic fibrous.

Psychological: depression, schizophrenia, eating disorders, post traumatic stress disorder, personality problems.

 

4. What are some implications that chronic illnesses cause for people?

Chronic illnesses can impact on all facets of people’s lives. What they can and can’t do. Here are some areas that may be implicated as a result of a chronic condition.

-          Relationships  - family, making and maintaining friends.

-          Employment

-          Living situations – some people can longer reside in their homes and need special care.

-          Education

-          What they do with their time – people may experience a loss in their freedom, due to things like medical appointments, being in and out of hospital.

Here was a great contribution from someone tonight – check out the spoon theory

the spoon theory? Basically it's one woman's analogy for living with a chronic illness and how it impacts on her life.

Basically, someone who has a chronic illness only has a limited amount of energy that they can use up each day. In the spoon theory, spoons are used as a metaphor for that energy - with tasks taking up 'spoons' (like, a shower costs a spoon, going to uni costs two spoons, dinner with friends costs a spoon, etc). For someone with a chronic illness, they only have a certain number of spoons to use each day. Once someone uses up a spoon, it's hard to get that spoon back until the next day. Stuff like getting out of bed, walking, driving etc can use far more energy than someone with a chronic illness might have. 

Essentially, the spoon theory is meant to explain to people that with a chronic illness, there's things you need to be aware of that you mightn't otherwise need to be. You need to make choices about what you can and can't do, within your limits, and while making sure that you're going to have enough spoons left to do the other things you need to do. It makes energy measurable, and it can be a really powerful explanation of what life is like with an ongoing illness.

The full theory is in the link above - it's definitely worth reading.”

 

5. Can you suggest some ways/ideas to cope with a chronic illness?

- Being aware of and knowing your limits. Realising that you sometimes need to make compromises is a factor in coping with chronic illness.

- Use online tools.

- Try and obtain all the information you can from professionals.

- search for support groups available

- go and have fun. It is important to still try and enjoy life as much as possible.

 

6. How does a chronic illness impact on friends and family?

People around someone with a chronic illness sometimes have to adjust their activities and accommodate this person’s needs. The person suffering a chronic illness sometimes needs extra assistance in day to day activities e.g. transport, personal care etc. If people lack understanding on chronic conditions it would be easy for family and friends to become annoyed, frustrated or angry about adjustments they need to make.

It’s important for family and friends to be aware of their limits in providing support.

 

7. What support systems/services are you aware that assist people with chronic illness? How are these services also beneficial for family and friends?

 

8. Are you able to find a "fun fact" on chronic illness and share it in the discussion tonight? Please copy and paste below. Here's an example: "Indigenous Australians experience higher levels of certain chronic conditions than non-Indigenous Australians. In 2004-05, more Indigenous Australians experienced hypertensive disease, other diseases of the heart and circulatory system, asthma, diabetes, arthritis and kidney disease. See Indigenous health."

  • In 2006-07, arthritis, diabetes and depression were chronic      conditions commonly managed at GP consultations (each accounted for 2.5%      of all consultations). See Australia's health 2008.
  • More than half of all potentially preventable hospitalizations are      from selected chronic conditions. In 2007-08, 19.24 (per 1,000      separations) were for chronic conditions such as diabetes, asthma, angina,      hypertension, congestive heart failure and COPD. See Australian hospital statistics 2007-08.
  • Ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease (mainly stroke),      lung cancers, COPD and and colorectal cancer all featured in the top 10 leading      causes of death in 2005. See Australia's health 2008.
  • Indigenous Australians experience higher levels of certain chronic      conditions than non-Indigenous Australians. In 2004-05, more Indigenous      Australians experienced hypertensive disease, other diseases of the heart      and circulatory system, asthma, diabetes, arthritis and kidney disease.      See Indigenous health.
  • In 2004-05, people with chronic disease were more likely to not      participate in the labour force, were less likely to be employed      full-time, and more likely to be unemployed, than those without chronic      disease. See Chronic disease and participation in work.

Lastly guys why not check out our fact sheet….

http://au.reachout.com/Tough-Times/Physical-health/Serious-and-chronic--illness

Thanks again for tonight everyone.

Re: Chronic illnesses affect all of us

Thanks for the discussion guys! Goodnight Smiley Happy

Re: Chronic illnesses affect all of us

Thanks for tonight everyone! A tricky subject and I think we covered some good issues...

Online Community Manager

ReachOut.com

Re: Chronic illnesses affect all of us

Thanks everyone Smiley Happy