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Re: Live GR: Discrimination, 18th of May, 7:30 pm AEST

I also wanted to mention before but forgot that within mental health care there is a lot of gender based and racial discrimination. Often symptoms are based off white males this is particularly true for autism and at other times the needless gendering of male vs famale symptoms makes it very difficult for people who aren’t cis gender or male to receive an accurate diagnosis. Women with autism usually receive their diagnosis 10+ years later than males and people of color are also often diagnosed later. I also think that for me having to play white all the time makes me extra good at looking like there is nothing wrong with me but also there is this thing drs do where if you are a pretty white female they take you are lot more seriously and don’t try and rush you out of the hospital as quickly when you are still unwell. It happens so often and black males are often assumed to have aggression issues, but any non attractive women are just labeled attention  seekers. There is honestly so much discrimination within mental health care it is ridiculous but I am going to stop here for now.

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Re: Live GR: Discrimination, 18th of May, 7:30 pm AEST

Hello @Eden1717, thanks for sharing your experiences. I am sorry to hear that your experiences with the health care system have not been overly positive. You have brought up some important and interesting points that I think other people may resonate with. I am glad that you are feeling comfortable enough to share your experiences with us Heart
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Re: Live GR: Discrimination, 18th of May, 7:30 pm AEST

I got to this convo a little later than expected.... once uni is over, I'm going to join the chat live, one of these days!

 

What might discrimination look like? What contexts can discrimination occur in?

 

Unfortunately, it can come in many forms... microaggressions, for example, are small, daily occurrences that carry negative messages directed at marginalised groups, often towards POC. 

 

Who are some people who are more likely to face discrimination in our current society?

POC, WOC, queer people and people with different abilities!

 

What are some things we can do to prevent ourselves from judging or discriminating against others?

Get to know them, educate yourself, research, ask Qs respectfully! and Listen!

 

What can you do/ where can you get support if you're being discriminated against?
Ask what they need- don't assume! And listen to them. Help them practise self-care!

 

How can you support someone who is being discriminated against? What are some good ways to be there for someone who is facing discrimination? Maybe something you've done before and recommend to others!

It may be a little unusual, but I actually use my writing to help raise awareness and provide positive/educational messages...so hopefully that helps the community as a whole? And the individual that reads it? I hope so anyways!

 

How can we take steps towards change in society to make it a less discriminating place? Can you think of any other ways to be an ally for groups facing prejudice?

Yay, allyship! I think being an ally is key, as well as educating yourself, and learning how to create safe spaces for others properly. 

 

 

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Re: Live GR: Discrimination, 18th of May, 7:30 pm AEST

@Eden1717  yep, I totally agree, say it louder for the people in the back! This experience is unfortunately not unique or isolated; none of us are alone in this!

 

@Saltwaterdreamtime  yep, what you said about discrimination about being subtle is so real... it can be as simple as not been seen or heard, I think. 

 

@WheresMySquishy  The part about your neighbours, yep! Same here!

 

@Hozzles what about you said using neutral pronouns, I'm going to take that on board!

 

@xXLexi_Lou122Xx  I'm so sorry people thought you were attention-seeking when asking for help, that sucks!

 

Thanks for a great convo as always my good people! Til next time!

 

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Re: Live GR: Discrimination, 18th of May, 7:30 pm AEST

I can't stress how important this conversation is and I'm so proud of this community after reading through everyone's responses. 

 

What might discrimination look like? What contexts can discrimination occur in?

 

Discrimination looks like placing boundaries in someones life as a direct result of something they don't have control over. Whether it be their class, gender, sexuality, ethnicity or body. Unfortunately discrimination can occur across all social institutions and parts of society. It can also trickle down from beliefs held by the family you grew up in or your location. 

 

Who are some people who are more likely to face discrimination in our current society?

 

People who live in poverty, people who live with disability, First Nations/Indigenous people, LGBTIQA+ community, women and also men. 

 

What are some things we can do to prevent ourselves from judging or discriminating against others?

 

Challenge your world view and open yourself up to different perspectives when possible. Always listen to other peoples experience of life. Approach people with compassion. 

 

What can you do/ where can you get support if you're being discriminated against?

 

Take legal avenues when possible and if you're comfortable, contact Victim Services if you have been subject to violence, reach out to community initiatives and organisations, connect with your community - whoever they may be. 

 

How can you support someone who is being discriminated against? What are some good ways to be there for someone who is facing discrimination? Maybe something you've done before and recommend to others!

 

Listen to them, help them make contact with necessary supports, validate them. If you see discrimination taking place in public, if you are comfortable and think it is safe, you can stand by them. Simply having presence can help diffuse a situation and also lets the person in question know that they aren't alone. 

 

How can we take steps towards change in society to make it a less discriminating place? Can you think of any other ways to be an ally for groups facing prejudice?

 

Being a good ally looks like: Letting people experiencing discrimination speak for themselves, facilitating space for those people to talk about their experiences and needs. Creating opportunities for people experiencing discrimination. Using your voice to help educate people in your life who may not understand (It is hard but this is usually more successful if you show empathy to the person who doesn't understand how they are being discriminatory). 

 

If you are a person who has been discriminated against, never ever think you don't deserve representation and a seat at the table. As a woman of colour who is part of the LGBTIQA+ community, I have experienced my fair share of discrimination - but I'll never stop talking about my unique experiences and I'll always be proud of the different aspects of my identity. 

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Re: Live GR: Discrimination, 18th of May, 7:30 pm AEST

People Power Fist GIF by James Thacher

 

Hey community!  

 

We wanted to check in with everyone here in light of the recent events in the United States which have opened up a global discussion about systemic racism. In Australia there has been a light shed on Aboriginal deaths in police custody and around the world people are talking about violence against people of colour.

 

First and foremost we think it’s important to acknowledge that these world events can be extremely triggering and traumatic for people. Please do what you need to do to protect yourself in this time. I think it’s important to say that there is no pressure to participate in rallies or protests. It’s okay to not know what to do and to be worried about your personal safety as we are still experiencing a pandemic. As always in this time, decide how much time you want to spend on social media as it can be a very stressful place to be at the moment. 

 

In saying all of this, that doesn’t mean you can’t be a powerful ally if that is important to you. There are so many ways to show solidarity and take action. So we thought we would put together a list of how you can be part of positive change. 

 

Learn - one of the most important things you can do is continue to learn about racism and the groups of people in society that are most impacted. 

 

Talk - another extremely important action for change is to use your voice. I personally find this difficult as confrontation scares me but talking to those friends and family members of yours that hold onto some harmful beliefs, having a calm but informative conversation can be a game changer. 

 

Donate - There are lots of grassroots collectives and organisations that are doing amazing front line work to empower people and communities. Money does make a difference so if you have a little extra, contributing to one of these causes and a massive help.

 

U.S based: 

Black Lives Matter

Black Visions Collective

Reclaim the Block

Official George Floyd Memorial Fund

NAACP Legal Defense Fund

American Civil Liberties Union

National Bail Fund Network or local bail funds across the US

National Police Accountability Project

Know Your Rights Camp

 

Australian based: 

Fundraiser for the family of David Dungay Jr.

David Dungay Jr., a Dunghutti man from Kempsey, NSW, died in custody in December 2015. He was surrounded by six guards as he screamed “I can’t breathe”. This fundraiser was created by his mother, Leetona Dungay, who is appealing to the Director of Public Prosecutions for the NSW Government to take responsibility for the death of her son. All proceeds raised will fund the ongoing expenses for her campaign.

Fundraiser for the family of Kumanjayi Walker

19-year-old Kumanjayi Walker was shot dead by police in his Yuendumu home in November 2019. The Warlpiri people are asking for an independent inquiry into both the shooting and community policing. Dr. Lisa Watts has organised this fundraiser to pay for lawyers’ travel to Yuendumu in order to facilitate their request.

Fundraiser for the family of Tanya Day

Tanya Day died in custody in December 2017, in a cell at the Castlemaine police station. This fundraiser, created by her daughter Apryl Day, will pay for legal proceedings, accommodation, travel and living expenses for Day’s extended family, allowing them to attend independent inquest hearings.

Fundraiser for the family of Joyce Clarke

29-year-old Joyce Clarke was shot and killed by police in Geraldton last year in September. The first class constable charged with her murder recently entered a not guilty plea ahead of his trial later this year. This fundraiser was set up by Debbie Kilroy, Order of Australia recipient and one of the nation’s leading advocates for protecting women and children’s rights through decarceration. Funds will be donated entirely to Clarke’s family to allow them to travel to all court proceedings.

Pay The Rent – An ongoing campaign that encourages non-Indigenous people to donate a portion of their income for operating on unceded Indigenous land. All funds raised are given to Aboriginal people in Victoria at the discretion of a group of Aboriginal elders from multiple clans and nations.

The National Justice Project – A non-profit legal service that represents people who would otherwise be unable to find legal representation.

Barpirdhila Foundation’s First Nations Artists & Community COVID-19 Appeal – A community-run non-for-profit organisation raising money to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists and communities affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

Sisters Inside – A not-for-profit organisation that “advocates for the collective human rights of women and girls in prison, and their families”.

Free Her – Organised by Debbie Kilroy of Sisters Inside, this ongoing campaign uses collected funds to release Aboriginal women from prison or pay outstanding warrants.

Black Rainbow – A wholly Indigenous-owned not-for-profit social enterprise that advocates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander LGBTQI+ peoples.

Change The Record – Australia’s only national Aboriginal-led coalition of peak Aboriginal bodies and non-Indigenous allies.

Warriors of the Aboriginal Resistance – A collective of Aboriginal youths advocating for decolonisation and the philosophies of Aboriginal nationalism.