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Re: Totally addicted to....................


@fosterthepeople wrote:
How can addiction impact on mental health?

When you're engaging in your addiction it might give you some highs as well - but they're only temporary. The fall/withdraw afterwards I think is what's gonna really hurt your mental health. afterwards.

Are the highs worth it? Some people, I suspect, would answer yes to this, but for the most part, I hope it's no.

 

But I think we have to realise that these are addictions we're talking about, and we're never going to be completely over them. It's like how Kieth Richards still has to do some drugs sometimes, because even after all this time of not doing them regularly; his body still needs it from time to time.

 

And I think it's the same thing for mental addictions, too. Even if we give them up; we're going to have withdrawals sometimes and go straight back to what we were doing, despite the fact we know how much the fall is going to affect us.

Highlighted

Re: Totally addicted to....................


_sagira_ wrote:

Pris wrote:

graphiqual wrote:

Pris wrote:

graphiqual wrote:

Pris wrote:

Birdeye wrote:

4. If you have an addiction is it something you have done alone or with friends?

 


I think most addictions (if not all?) are solitary acts, although they may involve other people and these other people may also be addicted or considered as friends, your addiction is still your addiction.


What if you're addicted to the company of another person? Like, emotionally addicted we're talking here. Would that still be considered a solitary addiction if they were addicted to you too?

 

Totally hypothetical, of course


I love that you brought this up because I would never have thought of addictions in this sense, but this is actually something I think I seriously struggle with, getting emotionally addicted and dependant to certain people. And I'd actually say an addiction is like this is so, so much a solitary addiction. Because I would never admit to the person how much I'm dependant on them, and it also becomes a vicious cycle of feeling so alone when you're without them, feeling like the time you have with them is never enough, and therefore feeling almost constantly alone. 


Yeah, that's all true, provided you're the one addicted to them and it's not a mutual thing. It can be dangerous when that happens because it can really affect your mindset over a long period of time if it's like this.

 

But the second half of the hypothetical is important too, I think. What if they're also addicted to you? Does this make things better? Does it make things worse? And do you think that you'll spiral into a well of isolation, with this one person your only real contact with the outside world?

 

I think it can become even more dangerous in this circumstance, because what happens after you drift apart, as you eventually will? Like, it's going to take a long, long time to pick yourself back up after this.


I think if it's a mutual thing it can be even more dangerous. But it also depends on the intensity. Because I think for one person to be completely dependant on someone else can be extremely unhealthy, both for themself (because of the isolation) and the other person (because of the pressure it puts on them), so when it's both ways, it sort of just magnifies that. 

 

And as you say, there's the point where you eventually separate. Which I've experienced, which near broke me. So yes, very unhealthy. 


There we go. And yeah, there's definitely that pressure there when it's a mutual thing. Like, how would you even begin to reconcile yourself after that? I don't know, I've never been through it, and if I bothered to Google it, there might be some sort of risk for PTSD after it.


It wasn't a mutual thing, but a one way thing for me.  I had so much stress and anxiety when my friend just completely cut me off for no explanation.  She was like my soul mate and I was obsessed with her.  For years and years I have been battling the hurt that came from it.  I'm reluctant to really let new people in.  Anyway...I eventually got to a point where I completely forgave her.  It was so liberating and we're still friends now.  None of it was ever explained...but it doesn't matter because she's still in my life, but in a different capacity. 


Yeah, sometimes life's like that, isn't it? You don't know everything about a situation, even if you're deeply involved in it. But what you can do is make the best of things given what you have and what you know

Re: Totally addicted to....................


_sagira_ wrote:

Pris wrote:

graphiqual wrote:

Pris wrote:

graphiqual wrote:

Pris wrote:

Birdeye wrote:

4. If you have an addiction is it something you have done alone or with friends?

 


I think most addictions (if not all?) are solitary acts, although they may involve other people and these other people may also be addicted or considered as friends, your addiction is still your addiction.


What if you're addicted to the company of another person? Like, emotionally addicted we're talking here. Would that still be considered a solitary addiction if they were addicted to you too?

 

Totally hypothetical, of course


I love that you brought this up because I would never have thought of addictions in this sense, but this is actually something I think I seriously struggle with, getting emotionally addicted and dependant to certain people. And I'd actually say an addiction is like this is so, so much a solitary addiction. Because I would never admit to the person how much I'm dependant on them, and it also becomes a vicious cycle of feeling so alone when you're without them, feeling like the time you have with them is never enough, and therefore feeling almost constantly alone. 


Yeah, that's all true, provided you're the one addicted to them and it's not a mutual thing. It can be dangerous when that happens because it can really affect your mindset over a long period of time if it's like this.

 

But the second half of the hypothetical is important too, I think. What if they're also addicted to you? Does this make things better? Does it make things worse? And do you think that you'll spiral into a well of isolation, with this one person your only real contact with the outside world?

 

I think it can become even more dangerous in this circumstance, because what happens after you drift apart, as you eventually will? Like, it's going to take a long, long time to pick yourself back up after this.


I think if it's a mutual thing it can be even more dangerous. But it also depends on the intensity. Because I think for one person to be completely dependant on someone else can be extremely unhealthy, both for themself (because of the isolation) and the other person (because of the pressure it puts on them), so when it's both ways, it sort of just magnifies that. 

 

And as you say, there's the point where you eventually separate. Which I've experienced, which near broke me. So yes, very unhealthy. 


There we go. And yeah, there's definitely that pressure there when it's a mutual thing. Like, how would you even begin to reconcile yourself after that? I don't know, I've never been through it, and if I bothered to Google it, there might be some sort of risk for PTSD after it.


It wasn't a mutual thing, but a one way thing for me.  I had so much stress and anxiety when my friend just completely cut me off for no explanation.  She was like my soul mate and I was obsessed with her.  For years and years I have been battling the hurt that came from it.  I'm reluctant to really let new people in.  Anyway...I eventually got to a point where I completely forgave her.  It was so liberating and we're still friends now.  None of it was ever explained...but it doesn't matter because she's still in my life, but in a different capacity. 


I suppose my most recent experience with this was with a mentor who was one of my highschool teachers, she helped me through a lot of stuff and I became very dependant on her, but obviously that could only be a one way thing. Well at some point she unexpectedly had to move overseas permanently, and even though we kept in touch through email, it hurt so much. But since then, I've grown more aware of how I hold to people so tightly and why I do it, and I'm slowly starting to learn that I can stand on my own two feet. 

 

How can addiction impact on mental health?


So in terms of mental health, that'll be an example of how my experience with addiction totally screwed me over and made me extremely depressed for a while. 

Re: Totally addicted to....................

@Pris I would argue that the highs are not worth it, surely a long term fix is better than short term, if we’re purely comparing coping mechanisms. I think that in regard to addictions we sometimes may forget that physiologically our addiction is a WANT and not a NEED. I also truly believe that people can be completely free of their addictions - relapse can certainly happen, but it is far from defeat.

Re: Totally addicted to....................


graphiqual wrote:

_sagira_ wrote:

Pris wrote:

graphiqual wrote:

Pris wrote:

graphiqual wrote:

Pris wrote:

Birdeye wrote:

4. If you have an addiction is it something you have done alone or with friends?

 


I think most addictions (if not all?) are solitary acts, although they may involve other people and these other people may also be addicted or considered as friends, your addiction is still your addiction.


What if you're addicted to the company of another person? Like, emotionally addicted we're talking here. Would that still be considered a solitary addiction if they were addicted to you too?

 

Totally hypothetical, of course


I love that you brought this up because I would never have thought of addictions in this sense, but this is actually something I think I seriously struggle with, getting emotionally addicted and dependant to certain people. And I'd actually say an addiction is like this is so, so much a solitary addiction. Because I would never admit to the person how much I'm dependant on them, and it also becomes a vicious cycle of feeling so alone when you're without them, feeling like the time you have with them is never enough, and therefore feeling almost constantly alone. 


Yeah, that's all true, provided you're the one addicted to them and it's not a mutual thing. It can be dangerous when that happens because it can really affect your mindset over a long period of time if it's like this.

 

But the second half of the hypothetical is important too, I think. What if they're also addicted to you? Does this make things better? Does it make things worse? And do you think that you'll spiral into a well of isolation, with this one person your only real contact with the outside world?

 

I think it can become even more dangerous in this circumstance, because what happens after you drift apart, as you eventually will? Like, it's going to take a long, long time to pick yourself back up after this.


I think if it's a mutual thing it can be even more dangerous. But it also depends on the intensity. Because I think for one person to be completely dependant on someone else can be extremely unhealthy, both for themself (because of the isolation) and the other person (because of the pressure it puts on them), so when it's both ways, it sort of just magnifies that. 

 

And as you say, there's the point where you eventually separate. Which I've experienced, which near broke me. So yes, very unhealthy. 


There we go. And yeah, there's definitely that pressure there when it's a mutual thing. Like, how would you even begin to reconcile yourself after that? I don't know, I've never been through it, and if I bothered to Google it, there might be some sort of risk for PTSD after it.


It wasn't a mutual thing, but a one way thing for me.  I had so much stress and anxiety when my friend just completely cut me off for no explanation.  She was like my soul mate and I was obsessed with her.  For years and years I have been battling the hurt that came from it.  I'm reluctant to really let new people in.  Anyway...I eventually got to a point where I completely forgave her.  It was so liberating and we're still friends now.  None of it was ever explained...but it doesn't matter because she's still in my life, but in a different capacity. 


I suppose my most recent experience with this was with a mentor who was one of my highschool teachers, she helped me through a lot of stuff and I became very dependant on her, but obviously that could only be a one way thing. Well at some point she unexpectedly had to move overseas permanently, and even though we kept in touch through email, it hurt so much. But since then, I've grown more aware of how I hold to people so tightly and why I do it, and I'm slowly starting to learn that I can stand on my own two feet. 

 

How can addiction impact on mental health?


So in terms of mental health, that'll be an example of how my experience with addiction totally screwed me over and made me extremely depressed for a while. 


Yeah sometimes it's not so much the getting addicted to a person, but getting addicted to someone you shouldn't!!  Like my first one was my actual friend...so that wasn't so bad.  But then it was my Dr, then my hairdresser whom I saw a lot and they both knew an awful lot about me.  I even became FB friends with both of them...which actually made it worse. 

Re: Totally addicted to....................

whoa! some of those reply-threads are getting loooong! im loving you great replies tonight - and so many! maybe we can cut down the quotes to a shorter level!!! Smiley Happy

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Re: Totally addicted to....................

We've spoken about how our addiction can affect our mental health. So if we (or someone we knew) did have an addiction:

6. Who would you be likely to turn to for help? Where could you go for help?

Re: Totally addicted to....................


@bethechange wrote:

@Pris I would argue that the highs are not worth it, surely a long term fix is better than short term, if we’re purely comparing coping mechanisms. I think that in regard to addictions we sometimes may forget that physiologically our addiction is a WANT and not a NEED. I also truly believe that people can be completely free of their addictions - relapse can certainly happen, but it is far from defeat.


I'd argue that too, but who's to say for sure there isn't someone who thinks the highs are worth it?

 

I wouldn't argue that a relapse is necessarily a defeat, either. What I would argue, however, is that the relapse is a sign that you're not completely free from the addiction, though, because there's still that part of you that remembers doing it; that wants to do it. Although, I suppose that depends on how you define freedom, really.

Re: Totally addicted to....................


@bethechange wrote:

@Pris I would argue that the highs are not worth it, surely a long term fix is better than short term, if we’re purely comparing coping mechanisms. I think that in regard to addictions we sometimes may forget that physiologically our addiction is a WANT and not a NEED. I also truly believe that people can be completely free of their addictions - relapse can certainly happen, but it is far from defeat.


Most definitely.  I think it's about non-attachment and realising the addictions are not you, but an evilly constructed web of delusion that your ego has attached to.  It doesn't make you, you, it's your ego attaching to an identity.

Re: Totally addicted to....................


@Sophie-RO wrote:
whoa! some of those reply-threads are getting loooong! im loving you great replies tonight - and so many! maybe we can cut down the quotes to a shorter level!!! Smiley Happy

Yeah, I was thinking the same thing, too. It's starting too look like one of those long, long, long threads on imdb now, lol