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Re: [SPECIAL GUEST] Self injury: riding the wave of distressed emotions

@stonepixie it's a tough question hey! and really requires you to think twice.

 

i think self harm can definitley be physical, but there are lots of other self harming behaviours that might also be emotional. the mind is a crazzzzzy and crafty thing and when we're not feeling great it can have evil powers sometimes i rekon! Smiley Tongue

 

lanejane
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Re: [SPECIAL GUEST] Self injury: riding the wave of distressed emotions

I agree @lanejane your own thoughts can be pretty damaging
//You can stay afraid, or slit the throat of fear and be brave//

Re: [SPECIAL GUEST] Self injury: riding the wave of distressed emotions

i love your response to question 1 @j95

spot on!

lanejane

Re: [SPECIAL GUEST] Self injury: riding the wave of distressed emotions

I am getting the feeling we're all on the same page here. So let's share Sarah's response

 

Does self harm always have to be physical? When

people talk about it, they always refer to physical injury. But I

know in the past I've tried to 'hurt' myself emotionally before, or

I've purposely exposed myself to triggering material to feel bad.

 

@SarahS answered:

Firstly, to clarify, self-harm is an umbrella term that includes all

behaviours done by a person, directly or indirectly, with and

without suicidal intent, to hurt oneself (this includes ‘self-injury’,

which refers to nonsuicidal and direct harm to the body.
‘Self-harm’ that is not physical (such as verbal put-

downs or sabotaging relationships) is not generally included in

the definition of self-harm, but can still be a significant problem

and can respond well to treatment. In fact, most people who

hurt themselves physically also hurt themselves verbally and

emotionally. It is often associated with low self-esteem and self-

loathing, which can be a consequence of bullying or high levels

of criticism (both in the family and at school), abuse or other

trauma.

Re: [SPECIAL GUEST] Self injury: riding the wave of distressed emotions

I see LOTS of patients with verbal put-downs which I definitely see as a type of self-harm. 

 

Re: [SPECIAL GUEST] Self injury: riding the wave of distressed emotions

Ahh interesting @SarahS I never thought about this as a form of Self-harm. 

 

Re: [SPECIAL GUEST] Self injury: riding the wave of distressed emotions

what an informative response @SarahS

 

it's good to know the different types of self harming behaviours! i think its really interesting to stop and think about the way we behave... and think about other behaviours we are doing that are unhealthy but haven't even realised?

lanejane

Re: [SPECIAL GUEST] Self injury: riding the wave of distressed emotions

Can harming your relationships be self harm? Obviously harmful for the other person but if done deliberately to punish oneself could it be considered a form of self harm??
//You can stay afraid, or slit the throat of fear and be brave//

Re: [SPECIAL GUEST] Self injury: riding the wave of distressed emotions

put downs are such a hard thing to stop once they creep in to your head, don't you reckon?

lanejane

Re: [SPECIAL GUEST] Self injury: riding the wave of distressed emotions

I think that another form of non-physical self harm would be to deliberately isolate yourself from other people, even though you'd like to be with them, as a means of punishing yourself