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Super frequent scribe
Posts: 103
Registered: ‎01-03-2017

dislosure

hi im sure we've probably had this experience

 

so its taken me about 1 and a bit to come forward about getting a diagnosis for my mental helth conditions and now that i have it kinda makes me feel weird. its a bit hard to explain but i was relieved to start with to finally get a diagnoses but now im not so sure how to handle it...


ive just been diagnosed with severe PTSD, severe generalised anxiety disorder, mild social phobia, depression as well as insomia which thats not so new to me but the the other 4 are. how would you cope with these diagnoses? did you feel strange after you got a diagnoses for any of your conditions?

 

oh and today when i went to see a psychiatrist for the first time i partly disclosed another one of my issue tat is a very very very deep secret but i really didnt want to and i didnt want anyone else to know about it and it making me feel really nervous and sick that someone else knows. when i walked out of the consult i was feeling really sick to the point where i thought i had to pull the car over to empty the stomach contents ewwwy


has anyone else had this sort of experience before?

Mod Squad
Posts: 1,745
Registered: ‎23-09-2016

Re: dislosure

Hey @setmefree thank you so much for sharing.

 

On your last point, feeling that way from disclosing a traumatic event. Totally common from what I can tell, just your body's coping strategy I would say. Amazing work on getting the ball rolling. PTSD is an ongoing journey you're just at the start of so please feel free to jump on RO and have a yarn whenever you're feeling like you need a community of like minded individuals. 

@DruidChild and @j95 What were your experiences right after mental illness diagnosis? Maybe we could share our stories to assist @setmefree.. 

@setmefree If it helps as well Sane Aus have good links on PTSD. They even have cool DVD kits (and a tonne of free resources online)! [click here] Smiley Happy

Super frequent scribe
Posts: 103
Registered: ‎01-03-2017

Re: dislosure

hi @Bree-RO

 

yeah its prety scary getting all these diagnoses an pretty overwhleming too but in a way a bit of relief to know what it is at least and now i can try to work forward to making it more bearable to live with.

 

thank you ill take a look at the resources thanks Smiley Happy

Builder
Posts: 15,615
Registered: ‎17-04-2014

Re: dislosure

Hey!! @setmefree

I was diagnosed with Generalized anxiety disorder when I was like 15 or 16 I think and PTSD only a couple of years ago (which they actually tried to diagnose me with something different at first but it wasn't right).
Both times, it didn't really come as shock, it was like putting a name to the symptoms I'd had for so long. It was tough though, no doubt, I was like woah, it's almost a bit confronting to be told you've got a mental illness. But really it was a step forward into making changes, because having a diagnosis didn't make the symptoms worse at all, just put a name to them and helped me create a path on how to make things better. It was strange, yeah for sure, almost like I had a choice, I could get really mad or sad about it, or I could use to propel me to getting further help, which I did eventually. And it's OK to feel upset about it, and then once you've had a little time to be sad or angry, it's then time to look at your options.

PTSD and Anxiety are really tough, but whenever you need myself and the rest of RO will be here.
//caught in fire, watch me burn gonna live my life, mark these words cause I'm home//
Super star contributor
Posts: 2,474
Registered: ‎28-05-2016

Re: dislosure

Hi @setmefree! Welcome to ReachOut Smiley Happy @j95 gave you a really awesome and inspiring reply yesterday, I just wanted to chime in with my experience as well Smiley Happy

About a year ago I was diagnosed with generalised anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder, as well as some social anxiety symptoms. I was pretty surprised by the depression diagnosis, but I was really glad to get an anxiety diagnosis because I'd been having those symptoms since I was little. I think the best thing about getting a diagnosis is that once you know what's going on, you're able to access the help and support (like medication, therapy, etc) that you need in order to recover and live your best life alongside your mental illness. It's hard to heal when you don't understand what's happening to you.

I also found it really hard to face the idea that I had a mental illness, especially mental illness that was chronic and that I might live with my whole life. I had a lot of negative feelings towards myself, like thinking I was crazy or never going to get better. I found out that those things weren't true, though. By finding out more information on mental illness and by connecting with other people who have similar struggles (like on ReachOut) I'm working on overcoming those ideas Smiley Happy

How are you feeling about getting those diagnoses? What kinds of things do you think a diagnosis will help with, is there anything about them that's particularly confronting?

I think it was really brave of you to open up to your psychiatrist about those difficult symptoms. When it's your first time talking about something particularly tough, it's pretty normal to feel a lot of emotion afterwards - a few weeks ago I had a similar experience when I first told my counsellor about some of my intrusive thoughts, then had a huge, scary meltdown on the train home. How are you feeling today? We're here for you.

What helps you to feel good? Is there any self care that you like to practice or that helps you feel better when confronting things happen?

I bet you're an awesome person and be that you're going to achieve everything you want to in life. Receiving a diagnosis and opening up about your symptoms is one of the first steps in recovery Smiley Happy

Super frequent scribe
Posts: 103
Registered: ‎01-03-2017

Re: dislosure

hi @j95

 

thank you for sharing your story. yes having a name to them is a bit better and actually realising is a condition and the different ways i can treat it or help with the symptoms.

 

thanks for your support @j95

Super frequent scribe
Posts: 103
Registered: ‎01-03-2017

Re: dislosure

hi @DruidChild

 

i wasnt really surprised with the ptsd diagnsis but with gad, depression and social were quite a shock as i thought it was just one big condition but at least i know now.

i also foud that it was hard to come to terms that i actually had a condition or 4 and it was very overwhelming. i had and sill have very negative thougths about myself continuously.

 

im feeling  little more accepted about the diagnoses but still full of emotion towards the them but at least i know what they are and a little idea of how to proceed to get help which is going to see a psychologist and continuing with their treatments and checking in with my gp weekly.

 

 

 

Super star contributor
Posts: 2,474
Registered: ‎28-05-2016

Re: dislosure

Hey @setmefree

 

I can imagine that it would have been a shock, yeah. I think it shows a lot of strength that you were able to take that shock and overwhelming-ness and reach out for some support here at RO Smiley Happy Would you feel like having a chat and maybe challenging some of those negative thoughts? 

 

It's awesome that you've got a bit of a plan in place - I hope that your psychologist and GP are good supports for you Smiley Happy I wondered if you wanted to check out this factsheet - http://au.reachout.com/what-is-self-care - which is all about how to look after yourself when things are a bit overwhelming and stressful. 

Super frequent scribe
Posts: 103
Registered: ‎01-03-2017

Re: dislosure

Um yea please @DruidChild im not sure how to challange them though
Super star contributor
Posts: 2,474
Registered: ‎28-05-2016

Re: dislosure

Okay let's do this @setmefree Smiley Happy

 

There are two methods that I've been taught for challenging anxious and negative thoughts, I'm writing them out from memory so forgive me if I get some stuff wrong!! 

 

The first method is your basic thought reframing. 

Step one is identifying the thought/s that you're having. 

 

Next, you ask yourself some questions like: what am I thinking about myself? What am I thinking about other people? What am I thinking about the situation? How do I think I might cope? What will I do?

 

Then, you question whether the way you are thinking is helpful. You can ask whether the thought is:

Reasonable or catastrophic? 

Self enhancing or self defeating?

Logical or illogical? 

Accurate or inaccurate?

Flexible or rigid? 

 

Once you've assessed what the thought is, how it makes you think/feel, and whether or not it was helpful, you can challenge the thought by asking things like: what is the evidence for what I thought? What alternatives are there to what I'm thinking? What is the effect of thinking the way I do? What thinking errors as I making?

 

The second method is what I like to call being a truth detective Smiley Happy Basically with this one, I identify the thought, and then I use things that I already know (facts as well as my beliefs and values) to challenge the thought and find a more realistic way of thinking. 

 

Why don't we both choose a negative thought and do it together? That way we can help each other if we get stuck Smiley Happy

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